This Writing Technique Will Make Your Readers Fall in Love With Your Sentences

This Writing Technique Will Make Your Readers Fall in Love With Your Sentences

Two of the most vital skills you should focus on as a writer are how to tell a story that works and how to develop compelling characters . But once you’ve got that figured out, aren’t there other writing techniques, more subtle perhaps, that draw readers in and make stories shine? There are. And one of those writing techniques is called euphonics. Rayne Hall, author of the Writer’s Craft series, defines euphonics as “the use of sound devices for prose writing.” What’s so Great About This Writing Tecnique? Poets and musicians have long understood the power of euphonics. It is a foundational element of their work, but it can also be sprinkled into prose as long as the writer takes care not to overuse it. In a story, content is always more important than sound. Think of euphonics as an enhancer, the seasoning that really makes a recipe sing. Adding a judicious amount brings out the flavors and makes it special. Using too much ruins the effect and can even make it unpalatable. How Does Euphonics Work? Reading fiction should be an emotional experience, and euphonics helps create that by working on a reader’s subconscious to evoke images and emotions. Certain sounds affect our psyches in somewhat predictable ways. There are power words, words that frighten or infuse urgency, words that appeal to our sensual natures. In English class we learned about similar writing techniques, like onomatopoeia—words that sound like what they mean, such as sizzle, buzz, and boom. Euphonics employs the same idea but on a more subtle, psychological level. In her book Euphonics For Writers , Rayne Hall spends the first half describing the character of certain sounds in the English language and suggesting when to use them. In the second half of the book, she goes into detail about how to incorporate euphonics into your writing to get maximum value. Letters, Sounds, and Meaning In this article, I’ll share a few highlights from the first half. Read Euphonics For Writers to get the full scoop. B is for bully The B sound has a split personality. It’s big and bold and comes with words like braggart, brazen, and bastard. Using words that feature the B sound can infuse the story with a feeling of brutality. On the other hand, depending on how you use it, B can also be applied in humorous situations. Bungle, belch (remember Sir Toby?), and buffoon are just a few B words that conjure up comedy. Cheer for joy The Ch and J sounds give a reader’s subconscious mind reason to cheer: joy, jubilant, jamboree, chuckle, cherish, enjoy. Or just think J oslyn Ch ase! Ee is for creepy Eek! The long E sound evokes an eerie feeling: scream, shriek, creak, fear, flee, squeak, freak, and so on. F is for frivolous Think flighty, flake, frolic, frothy, folly, foolish, flutter, flirt, flippant, fun, fling, ruffles, frills, fringe, flourish, flowery, and filigree. You get the point. H is high-falutin’ The H sound is […]

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